Buyers’ Guide to VINTAGES May 2 – Part Two

New Zealand On Our Minds and The First Big Pink Release
By David Lawrason, with notes from Sara d’Amato and John Szabo MS

David Lawrason

David Lawrason

Early May in Canada has become synonymous with New Zealand wine. The marketing folks from the tiny, perfect, green isles have owned this calendar moment for years, with wine fairs in four cities this month (Montreal May 5, Toronto May 7, Halifax May 12 and Vancouver May 14). And to no one’s surprise, NZ is the feature on VINTAGES May 2 release – along with some German delights which John covered last week. There is also the season’s first platoon of 2014 pinkies, on which Sara reports below.

New Zealand is on my mind a lot these days, having visited three times within the last two years, most recently in March. I am particularly interested in NZ pinot noir (no other country boasts pinot as its lead red wine) and next week I will publish an overly long and long overdue WineAlign exclusive identifying over 20 pinot noir appellations in the country. NZ has come up the middle between Burgundy and warmer New World regions to establish a very appealing pinot comfort zone that slices off pieces of both old and new worlds.

For now however we focus on the VINTAGES selection, featuring new wines sourced by LCBO buyers, who have also visited NZ recently. There will be those who question government officials jetting off on wine buying trips, but I would rather have informed and engaged buyers than uninformed buyers. That said, I also know they are buying to a quality/price formula that will “work” on VINTAGES shelves in Ontario. There are some new brands, which is always great to see, but they fall within a predictable price/quality spectrum – late teens pricing, 87-90 range scoring. Perfectly fine, but they have not really unearthed what’s new and exciting in NZ.

What is happening is real terroir-based winemaking by some very accomplished, inquiring and impatient winemakers. And the Kiwi terroir is a complex, diverse, regional and interesting as any place on Earth. NZ has been reticent to trumpet this. Remember that it is a tiny global player and they are still more concerned about entrenching brand New Zealand than promoting terroir-driven wines. I would argue that they (and the LCBO) need to get beyond this mindset very quickly or they will lose engaged wine lovers willing to pay the $30, $40, $50 that shows what they can really do.

This is especially urgent with Marlborough sauvignon blanc, a wine in danger of flame-out if more terroir-based diversity and nuance is not pushed forward PDQ (pretty damn quick). And then there are the increasingly fascinating universes of pinot noir, chardonnay, riesling and even pinot gris – all being terroir wines that wine enthusiasts love to drink and discuss, and will happily pay a premium to acquire, when quality is there. And the quality is there.

The New Zealand picks

Te Whare Ra 2014 Sauvignon Blanc, Marlborough, South Island ($24.95)

Dog Point Pinot Noir 2012 Te Whare Ra Sauvignon Blanc 2014David Lawrason – Te Whare Ra is a member of a small but formidable Marlborough association of organic wine producers. Located near Renwick its biodynamic vineyards are on a terrace above the Wairu River valley floor (almost neighbours of Seresin). This is a cool, compact style that I really like, and is increasingly common (thank goodness).
John Szabo – Say what? That’s Tee-Far-ee-Rah, or “the house in the sun” for you non-Maori speakers, or simply TWR to friends. Anna and Jason Flowerday’s organically certified, biodynamically dabbling family estate has some of the oldest vines in Marlborough, closing in on four decades. And their wines, like this pure citrus and chive-scented, green apple and herbal sauvignon, are superior. There are no concessions to base commercial appeal made here, just authentic and honest stuff.

Dog Point 2012 Pinot Noir, Marlborough, South Island ($49.95)

John Szabo – I can’t remember a Dog Point wine that hasn’t been a leader in its category, and the 2012 pinot is no exception. If your impression of Marlborough pinot is a wine of light, simple, tart red fruit flavours (like many), this will change it. It’s rather dark and savoury, considerably more concentrated and deep than the average, with excellent intensity, length and complexity. Cellar for another 2-3 years for maximum enjoyment, or hold into the ’20s without a stretch. Best 2017-2024.
David Lawrason – So if you want to experience the kind of quality and excitement I am referring to above, this is your chance.  From one of the great estates of Marlborough, this is a lovely lifted, rich, vibrant and delicious pinot with compelling freshness amid a riot of flavours.

Elephant Hill 2013 Syrah, Hawke’s Bay, North Island ($22.95)

David Lawrason – The 2013 vintage is one of the best yet for NZ reds, including Hawke’s Bay. The region’s syrahs are on fire in NZ, but just beginning to appear here. If you are at all a fan of Rhone wines you need to give this a try – but age a few bottles as well. Very good value.  The Elephant Hill 2013 Pinot Noir is also a good buy.
Sara d’Amato – Elephant Hill’s syrah never disappoints with its immensely satisfying profile that has the peppery character of the Northern Rhone but the density of fruit of the new world.

Elephant Hill Hawke's Bay Syrah 2013  Opawa Pinot Gris 2014 Waimea Classic Riesling 2014Sugar Loaf Sauvignon Blanc 2014

Opawa 2014 Pinot Gris, Marlborough, South Island ($16.95)

David Lawrason – As anywhere NZ has some wineries trying to cash in on the fresh, simple pinot grigio global phenom. But they also have an increasing number of pinot gris aiming at Alsatian opulence and complexity. Some use some residual sugar cosmetics, but many others – like this – do not.  This is a great buy from stony soils in the Wairau.

Waimea 2014 Classic Riesling, Nelson, South Island New Zealand ($18.95)

John Szabo – As if to underscore the region’s rapidly growing reputation for fragrant wines, every three years Nelson hosts the “International Aromatics Symposium” (next on is in 2017) to dig deeply into what it takes to grow aromatic varieties like riesling, pinot gris, gewürztraminer, grüner veltliner, and the like. Waimea seems to have it dialled already, as the winery’s two offerings (also check out the Pinot Gris) in this release are terrific. Perhaps it’s the slightly cooler, cloudier, moister conditions here relative to Marlborough across the hills to the south. Maybe it’s acquired knowledge. Whatever it is, keep it up, please.

Sugar Loaf 2014 Sauvignon Blanc, Marlborough, ($20.95)
Sara d’Amato – A classic Marlborough sauvignon blanc at a very reasonable price. White pepper, lemon, cucumber and grapefruit don the palate of this complex and elegant find.

The Rosés are Flowing
by Sara d’Amato

Sara d'Amato

The rosés are out in full force and I can’t help but delight in this time of year. The romantic in me feels spring is truly upon us but the pragmatist sees that rosés are sorely under-used and under-appreciated. Rosés have both the refreshing nature of a white but the substance of a mild red which makes them incredibly versatile with summer food from barbeques to Souvlaki to fish and seafood.

In our annual round up, as often they do, the French lead the charge with the driest, most authentic and appealing wines. Unfortunately our selection is extremely limited when it comes to rosés and thus we have many styles and regions completely absent from our pool.

However, if our small assortment is any indication, the style of rosé is changing as a reflection of changing consumer preferences. I would like to say that the sweet candied rosés are a thing of the past but they do still creep in, providing the same type of satisfaction as a snow cone on a sunny day. But it is the less simplistic styles that are making the biggest splashes.

More and more, wineries are beginning to produce increasingly serious rosés in the fashion of Tavel in the southern Rhône. It makes a world of difference, in terms of quality when the rosés were intentionally made pink as opposed to being bled out to further concentrate red wines or are a result of a melting pot of underripe grapes unacceptable for reds. Usually darker in colour and with a more significant tannic presence, these styles can even undergo a small degree of ageing.

But rosés need not be too serious and often a simple dry style, refreshing and easy to drink on a hot summer day is the most satisfying of them all. Classically, you can find these wines from the pink capital that is the Côtes de Provence but the grenache-based reds of Spain can provide equally undemanding pleasure. These inexpensive, terrifically popular styles from across the globe are thankfully in good supply in this spring VINTAGES rosé feature.

Mas Des Bressades 2014 Cuvée Tradition Rosé, Costières de Nîmes, Rhône Valley, France ($15.95)

Sara d’Amato – A perennial favourite, the Mas des Bressades combines the dry, authentic, seriousness of the southern Rhône with the charm and easy-drinking appeal of the Languedoc. Excellent value.
David Lawrason – Made from the classic Rhône varieties – grenache, syrah and cinsault – this perennial fave  shows fairly generous floral, red currant, strawberry aromas with vague peppery spice. A rose for the table.

Bisquertt 2014 Kissing Rosé, Colchagua Valley, Chile ($13.95)

John Szabo – Forget the kitschy packaging and silly name; this wine is really much better than the label would indicate. I suggest soaking it off so you can properly enjoy this tidy rosé from the newly-admired país grape, a perfectly light, lively and serviceable, dry and fruity wine, best with a firm chill. I like the wild strawberry flavours and savoury herbal notes.
David Lawrason – The pais, or mission grape, was first brought to the western hemisphere by Spanish missionaries. By-passed for generations as a serious table wine grape it is finding resurgence in South America as a rose/fruity wine variety. This is very pleasant indeed.

Mas Des Bressades Cuvée Tradition Rosé 2014 Bisquertt Kissing Rosé 2014 Brotte Les Eglantiers Tavel 2014 Carpineto Rosato 2014 Torres Sangre De Toro Rose 2014

Brotte 2014 Les Eglantiers Tavel, Rhône Valley, France ($19.95)

Sara d’Amato – Tavel is a mecca for rosé lovers. This appellation produces only rosés and locals prefer to distinguish these high-class beauties by calling them only Tavel and never cheapening them with the term “rosé”. Here is a classic, timeless style and one of the very few wines in this release that can do with short to mid-term ageing.

Carpineto 2014 Rosato, Tuscany, Italy, ($14.95)

Sara d’Amato – A more subtle offering than the norm from Carpineto but very appealing in its delicacy and ethereal lightness. Notes of tomato leaf compliment the salinity and dried strawberry fruit.

Torres 2014 Sangre De Toro Rosé, Catalunya Spain ($13.95)
John Szabo –
Another reliable wine from Don Miguel Torres, well-priced, admirably dry, juicy and crispy. This is easy and accessible, but also better than the mean.

Château De Beaucastel Coudoulet De Beaucastel Blanc 2013A Parting Thought

Château De Beaucastel 2013 Coudoulet De Beaucastel Blanc, Côtes du Rhône ($33.95)

David Lawrason – In recent years I have been mesmerized by the white wines of Beaucastel. Is anyone doing better whites in the south of France?  This is a bright, gently nuanced, very elegant and reserved white from local Rhone varieties like grenache blanc, roussanne and viognier.  This is an In Store Discovery.

~

And that’s a wrap for this edition. We are already hard at work on the May 16 release, and we have some other things up our sleeve in May, including a new feature called Buy the Case that will highlight best buys from the consignment stocklists of Ontario’s importers. And I am particularly looking forward to the great WineAlign Rolling Limestone bus excursion to Terroir in Prince Edward County. Until then, enjoy a great week of weather ahead and hope to see you at the New Zealand Wine Fair.

David Lawrason
VP of Wine

From VINTAGES May 2, 2015

Lawrason’s Take
Sara’s Sommelier Selections
Szabo’s Smart Buys
Buyers’ Guide to VINTAGES – Part 1
All Reviews

Editors Note: You can find complete critic reviews by clicking on any of the highlighted wine names, bottle images or links. Paid subscribers to WineAlign see all critics reviews immediately. Non-paid members wait 60 days to see new reviews. Premium membership has its privileges; like first access to great wines!


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