Buyers’ Guide to VINTAGES Sept 13th – Part Two

Wines That Moved UsSept. 11, 2014

by David Lawrason with notes from Sara d’Amato and John Szabo MS

David New 2014

David Lawrason

In Part One of our September 2013 release preview we sifted through the large contingent of Ontario wines being offered by VINTAGES. And we have also just published an Ontario Wine Report that updates the many local wine events in the weeks ahead, and recommends even more Ontario wines available outside of the LCBO. All of which has left us a blank canvas this week to highlight a random selection of wines that simply moved us.

But before revealing them, a note that our critics’ reasons for selecting which wines to highlight can differ. We do not have a formula, and we don’t consult with each other. Personally I am moved first by quality, especially when from an unexpected place or winery. I love to see underdogs over-achieve. Often of late those wines have been organically or biodynamically grown without my knowing that fact ahead of time. But a wine will usually only show up among my picks if value is also a big factor.

Most important, there are many, many other wines not mentioned that we like and have rated highly. So not being mentioned does not mean they are not worthwhile, and I strongly urge you to go the next step and browse the entire slate of reviews from each critic. You can find the complete list of September 13th VINTAGES wines under Wine >> New Releases. Remember, however, that to access this list and to read all of the reviews you do need to subscribe (only $40/year). Paid subscribers get immediate access to new reviews, while non-paid members do not see reviews until 60 days later.

Sparkling

Lefèvre Rémondet Brut Blanc Crémant De Bourgogne

Vincent Couche 2002 Brut ChampagneVincent Couche Brut Champagne 2002, France ($49.95)
David Lawrason – This is great value in mature but still vibrant Champagne. I mean who expects a 14 year-old vintage Champagne to be this good and this youthful for $50 (a base price for Champagne). Vincent Couche is a leading light in the ranks of small “growers”, tending is 32 acres organically. I strongly suspect that accounts for the energy and depth that took me by surprise at the tasting bench, before I knew anything about Vincent Couche.

Lefèvre Rémondet Brut Blanc Crémant De Bourgogne, Burgundy, France ($20.95)
Sara d’Amato – A remarkable crémant that offers the toasty lees and depth of a Champagne. A blend of 70% pinot noir and 30% chardonnay makes for a good deal of substance and power. Celebration worthy.

Whites

Studert-Prüm 2012 Graacher Himmelreich Riesling Kabinett, Mosel, Germany ($20.95)
John Szabo – There’s simply nowhere in the world that can reproduce this wine style, and great Mosel Kabinett is surely among the world’s best wine buys. This is a superb, intensely mineral, very natural wine with an absolutely unique flavour profile, at a giveaway price. Best 2014-2022.
Sara d’Amato – This Kabinett is refreshingly traditional and offers so much enjoyment, complexity and stuffing for the price. Slate, petrol and buckwheat honey are offset by wild herbs and lemon curd. This unmistakable value is nervy with plenty of racy mineral and terrific length.

Michel Gassier 2013 Les Piliers Viognier, Languedoc-Roussillon, France ($18.95)
Sara d’Amato: This deliciously complex viognier boasts impressive freshness and balance with a long, lingering finish. A great deal of compelling flavours have been coaxed out this simple Vin de France from Michel Gassier who focuses on organic farming in the Costières de Nimes region. Try with crab or sushi.

Kunde Chardonnay 2012 Sonoma Valley, California ($21.95)
David Lawrason –  There is of course a strong movement to cool climate, lean, mineral chardonnays, but this celebrates what made first made California chardonnay famous. It is boldly fruity, delicious yet even handed in all respects.  Kunde Family Estate is an impressively large producer with vineyards both on the floor of and in the hills above Sonoma Valley. Winemaker Zach Long strives for “balanced fruit, and full flavoured complex wines”.  He’s nailed it here, at a good price.

Studert Prüm Graacher Himmelreich Riesling Kabinett 2012 Michel Gassier Les Piliers Viognier 2013 Kunde Chardonnay 2012 Stellenrust Wild Yeast Barrel Fermented Chardonnay 2011 Seresin Sauvignon Blanc 2013 Mallory & Benjamin Talmard Mâcon Uchizy 2012

Stellenrust 2011 Wild Yeast Barrel Fermented Chardonnay Stellenbosch, South Africa ($17.95) John Szabo – From a near-century-old estate with high-elevation vines in the cooler Bottelary ward of Stellenbosch, this is classy, complete, intriguing wine at a great price, for those seeking character and depth at a fine price, not just simple, fruity white.

Seresin 2013 Sauvignon Blanc Marlborough, New Zealand ($21.95)
David Lawrason – Here is another biodynamically farmed success story. It was a stellar vintage for NZ sauvignons with most showing real depth and vibrancy. What I like about this example is it’s leaner, more mineral style, whereas many Marlborough ‘savvies’ are getting very fruity, fatter and a touch sweet.

Mallory & Benjamin Talmard 2012 Mâcon-Uchizy, Burgundy, France ($16.95)
David Lawrason –  Great value here –  a lovely tender, fleshy and bright style of chardonnay that Macon does so well.  The sister and brother Talmard team have taken the family’s 31 ha – spread through four villages in southern Burgundy – and increased both quality and quantity.

Red Wines

Wits End Luna Shiraz 2012

Chateau Montelena Cabernet Sauvignon 2010

Reininger Cabernet Sauvignon 2012Reininger 2012 Cabernet Sauvignon, Walla Walla, Washington ($20.95)
David Lawrason – This is a great buy from the Pacific Northwest – so why not have included it in the PNW feature last month, where it might have received more attention?  This immediately impressed with structure and depth well beyond $20 – a classic firm yet generous cabernet to drink now or hold five years.
John Szabo – From the Pepper Bridge and Seven Hills vineyards, this is a full, dense, savoury and spicy Washington cabernet with firm, hard tannins and plenty of extract – not a wine for fans of fruit, but much more distinctive, “terroir”-dominated profiles. I’d suspect this will be better after another 1-2 years and hold for close to decade, which is rare indeed for a $20 US wine. Best 2015-2022.

Chateau Montelena 2011 Cabernet Sauvignon, Napa Valley, California ($59.95)
Sara d’Amato – While many of the 2011s from California are lean, a little mean and sadly dilute, Chateau Montelena has risen to the task of creating a wine for the ages with freshness, complexity and length. This stripped down version of this iconic cabernet is one of my favorites in recent memory

Wits End 2012 Luna Shiraz, McLaren Vale, South Australia ($16.95)
David Lawrason – I had just finished tasting the excellent $60 “Bruce” shiraz when along comes a shiraz of very similar style and only slightly less quality – at one third the price. Wits End is made by Chalk Hill Wines owned by the Harvey family. The wine is made by French oenologist Emmanuelle Requin-Bekkers, who apparently has a very elegant touch.

Château De Pierreux Brouilly 2013

Salton Classic Cabernet Franc 2012

Cederberg Shiraz 2010Château De Pierreux 2013 Brouilly, Beaujolais, France ($18.95)
David Lawrason – This jumped off the tasting bench with amazingly lifted florality and juiciness – the way I remember other fine Brouilly gamays over the years. It is from a very large estate that is now in the portfolio of Burgundy’s Boisset family, and has been converted to biodynamic viticulture.

Salton 2012 Classic Cabernet Franc, Serra Gaucha, Brazil, ($12.95)
Sara d’Amato – Although a very simple wine, it is pure, un-manipulated, juicy and certainly intended to please. A lovely value from Serra Gaucha – Brazil’s largest region under vine, producing over 85% of the country’s wine. Located on the border of Uruguay, its topography is made up on mostly low mountain ranges populated by “gauchos” (cowboys).

Cederberg 2010 Shiraz, Cederberg, South Africa ($24.95)
John Szabo – 250 kilometers north from Cape Town, the Cederberg winery (which confusingly shares its name with the Wine of Origin Cederberg ward, though it’s also the only winery in the region), is South Africa’s highest elevation wine farm at 950-1100 meters asl. The vineyards are surrounded by pristine fynbos (native vegetation) and there’s no downy mildew thanks to isolation and extreme conditions. This is savoury and firm syrah, fresh, dark-fruited and spicy, with excellent length. Best 2014-2020.

Stobi Vranec 2010

Dominio De Tares Cepas Viejas Mencia 2009

Carrick 2011 Pinot NoirCarrick Pinot Noir 2011, Central Otago, New Zealand ($38.95)
Sara d’Amato – Carrick has been producing noteworthy pinot noirs since the mid-90s that have featured potent, aromatic appeal and great refinement. Hailing from Central Otago, one would expect this to be, very ripe and perhaps a touch overblown. On the contrary, the wine is supremely elegant, slowly revealing layers of flavour in the glass. Nicely structured for mid-term cellaring.

Dominio De Tares 2009 Cepas Viejas Mencia, Bierzo ($29.95)
John Szabo - A reliable name in the region of Bierzo, Dominio de Tares’ “Cepas Viejas” (old vines) is produced from vines over 60 years old. This is just starting to come into prime drinking – I love the mature, spicy nature of this wine, coupled with freshness and structure, though there’s still lots of life ahead. Best 2014-2024.

Stobi 2010 Vranec, Tikves, Republic of Macedonia ($11.95)
John Szabo – for the price you can’t very well go far wrong here. In my slowly growing experience with Macedonian wine, the local variety vranec is easily the most interesting, hitting a profile that reminds me somewhat of cabernet franc with its dark fruit and floral aspects, and firm but not hard tannins. I have to say this is a very solid and flavourful wine for the money, and well worth a look. Best 2014-2020.

And that’s it for this week. We are working ahead on the September 27 release which features Portugal and a huge international selection as VINTAGES beefs up for the big autumn buying season. Also in the pipeline is an article on Niagara riesling by John Szabo, and then a look at the rieslings of Austria’ Wachau region by Julian Hitner.

Enjoy.

Until next time!

David Lawrason
VP of Wine

From VINTAGES September 13th release:

Lawrason’s Take
Szabo’s Smart Buys
Sara’s Sommelier Selections
All Reviews
Sept 13th Part One – Ontario Focus

Editors Note: You can find complete critic reviews by clicking on any of the highlighted wine names, bottle images or links. Paid subscribers to WineAlign see all critics reviews immediately. Non-paid members wait to see new reviews. Premium membership has its privileges; like first access to great wines!


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