Vintages Preview March 15 Release (Part Two)

The Highlight Reel and Beyond

Last week we brought you our highlights among the California wines in VINTAGES March 15 release, and they were, as usual, very tasty but very pricy. Our critics (David Lawrason, John Szabo and Sara d’Amato) combine this week to present a much wider, more eclectic and better value range of wines from around the globe. And we remind you that the wines below may be highlights, but they are not at all the whole story. Please, please spend some time searching out those wines that might be scoring 87 points at $15, or 91 points at $50 that have not quite made this value-oriented highlight reel.

WineAlign Ontario Critic Team

The Stars Align
(Wines independently highlighted by two or more critics.)

Château Le Vieux Serestin 2009Borges Reserva 2009Borges 2009 Reserva, Douro Valley, Portugal ($21.95). SD – For those who are looking to add to your cellar but are trying to stick to a budget, here is a wine that would do very well on its side for another 2-3 years. Alternatively, decanting for an hour or so would certainly be beneficial. The blend is mainly tinta roriz (tempranillo in Spain) and touriga nacional with a modern feel. Its award-winning streak is testament to its wide appeal. DL – There is not another region of Europe better poised to steal the reputation of Bordeaux for elegant, nuanced reds than Portugal’s Douro Valley. The transition from great sweet, port wines is, after all, only a change in processing. The terroir remains the same. And the arid, steep slope, granitic vineyards of the Douro are among the most important in the world.

Château Le Vieux Serestin 2009 Médoc, Bordeaux ($17.95). SD – One of the first Chateaux in Bordeaux to qualify for the new Cru Artisan qualification was re-introduced in 2006. Never heard of this classification? Not surprising – it dates back over 150 years and was forgotten until producers lobbied for EU recognition in 2004. A group of about 50 producers find themselves in this category, which is just below the classification of Cru Bourgeois and requires re-certification every 10 years. Le Vieux Serestin has been producing some exciting, eco-friendly and carefully managed wines under the direction of its current owners since the early 80s. This very good value blend is drinking at its peak now and shows both power and elegance. DL – I was completely surprised by the Bordeaux authenticity, appealing drinkability and complexity achieved under $20. Most Bordeaux of this quality are at least twice the price.

Rustenberg RM Nicholson 2010Clos La Coutale Cahors 2011Rustenberg 2010 R M Nicholson, Stellenbosch , South Africa ($19.95). JSz Here’s a fine, complex, distinctly South African cabernet sauvignon blended with shiraz, merlot and cabernet franc, named after former owner-winemaker Reg Merriman Nicholson, who lived and worked on the Rustenberg farm for 30 years. Its profile encompasses the unique earthy-medicinal flavours that will appeal to drinkers of old school, savoury wines. DL – Stellenbosch is among the most unique terroirs for cabernet in the world, a hot Mediterranean latitude air-conditioned by mountain slope altitudes and winds from False Bay on the Indian Ocean. The pre-historic granitic/sandstone soils impart a sense of iodine-like minerality that single malt lovers might appreciate. Gutsy stuff and not afraid to strut its origin.

Clos La Coutale 2011 Cahors, Southwest, France ($17.95). SD – A southwestern French treat, Cahors is made almost entirely from malbec (sometimes with a little merlot and tannat thrown in) and although stylistically very different from that of Argentina, it can be wonderfully compelling. This example is nicely representative but also quite approachable and friendly. JSz – Often a little too hard and angular for all but the most seasoned wine drinkers, this version of Cahors is rather ripe and polished, inviting and friendly, benefitting from the softening effects of 20% merlot blended with malbec. It’s a nice introduction to the region, easing outsiders (or Argentine malbec drinkers) into the structured world of Southwest France.

Lawrason’s Take

Domaine De Vaugondy Brut Vouvray Méthode Traditionnelle, Loire Valley, France ($15.95). Among  a strong selection of non-Champagne bubblies on this release, this stands out for its honest, chenin blanc authenticity delivered for a shockingly good price. The amount of bubbly produced in the Loire rivals Champagne. The production method is the same. Only the grapes are different, and yes, the price.

Zenato 2011 Sergio Zenato Lugana Riserva, Italy ($28.95). If you are a fan of rich, creamy whites but want to go sideways from chardonnay consider this bright, shiny opulent white from the trebbiano grape grown in the Lugana region at the foot of Lago di Garda. It’s a regular at VINTAGES, and deservedly so.

Domaine Masson-Blondelet 2012 Pouilly Fumé, Loire Valley, France ($26.95). In the rapidly improving New Zealand led world of sauvignon blanc this small appellation on the right bank of the Loire in central France – along with Sancerre on the opposite shore – remains the beating heart of the variety. It catches some New World brightness but doesn’t lose its sense of compactness, complexity and minerality.

Domaine De Vaugondy Brut VouvrayZenato Sergio Zenato Lugana Riserva 2011Domaine Masson Blondelet Pouilly Fumé 2012Domaine Richard Rottiers Moulin À Vent 2011Albert Morot Beaune Toussaints 1er Cru 2009

Domaine Richard Rottiers 2011 Moulin-à-Vent, Beaujolais ($24.95). The parade of delicious gamays from the ten ‘cru’ villages of Beaujolais continues. If the price seems a tad higher than others it’s because Moulin-à-Vent is considered the most “serious” of the village wines, and most ageworthy. If you want to test that proposition buy at least three, drink one bottle now then stash the remainder for up to five years. Mature Moulin begins to resemble pinot noir.

Albert Morot 2009 Beaune Toussaints 1er Cru ($59.95). Burgundy purists may regard the warm 2009 vintage as just a bit too easy going and fruity (god forbid there be fruit). This is a very well made and balanced 2009, a classic strawberry-cherry centred Beaune, from an excellent producer. And there is no shortage of complexity as it begins to sail in the waters of maturity. All with great presence.

Ridge Lytton Springs 2011Giogantinu Nastarrè 2012Giogantinu 2012 Nastarrè Isola dei Nuraghi, Sardinia ($18.95). This is the find of the release for adventurers – a rustic, classic Euro red made from local varieties like Pascale di Cagliari, Malaga and Monica Cagnulari blended with some Nebbiolo (finally a grape I know). The company’s website (Giogantinu is a large co-operative) advises drinking it young “to preserve its vivacious taste”. Vivacious is exactly right.

Ridge 2011 Lytton Springs Dry Creek Valley, Sonoma County ($48.95). Last week my colleagues mentioned this lovely wine in passing – to me it is the best buy in the California feature, especially if – like me – you are a disenchanted zinfandel fan. So many lesser examples are being mocha-fied and sweetened that I was thrilled to find one that was not only authentic, but dazzling. Lytton Springs does not name zinfandel on the label because it is a “field blend” that contains portions of other varieties that may add up to more than 25%. USA regs dictate a varietal name can only be used if it has 75%.

Sara’s Sommelier Selections

Moulin Camus Sèvre et Maine Sur Lie 2012, Loire, France ($16.95). Produced from the melon de Bourgogne varietal, Muscadet Sèvre et Maine is generally a light, fresh wine with an abundance of mineral. This version has a little more sass and depth than is the norm. One of the best examples I can recall tasting that has come through the shelves of VINTAGES. Don’t miss out, especially at this price.

Jermann 2012 Pinot Grigio, Venezia Giulia, Friuli, Italy ($32.95). It is a pricy pinot grigio but also not your typical pinot grigio. In fact, it is more akin to the rich, textured, layered examples of Alsace. With tremendous depth and length, this vibrant, rich and substantial white is sure to turn heads.

Santa Carolina 2010 Reserva De Familia Cabernet Sauvignon, Maipo Valley, Chile ($18.95). Here is a cabernet that will make it easy to please just about any guest. Nicely representative of the aromatic Maipo style and with just the right amount of complexity to maintain intrigue. As one of Chile’s oldest vineyards and high up on the list of the country’s most profitable wineries, there is great value to be found here.

Moulin Camus Muscadet Sèvre Et Maine Sur Lie 2012Jermann Pinot Grigio 2012Santa Carolina Reserva De Familia Cabernet Sauvignon 2010Patrick Lesec Cuvée Suzon Beaumes De Venise Côtes Du Rhône Villages 2011Tenuta Stefano Farina Le Brume 2009

Patrick Lesec 2011 Cuvée Suzon Beaumes De Venise, Côtes Du Rhône Villages,  France ($19.95). Beaumes de Venise makes most people familiar with the appellation think of the sweet Muscat de Beaumes de Venise. However, the region is more recently known for their dry, red blends of grenache, syrah and mourvedre. The grapes are grown on the slopes of the foothills of the Dentelles de Montmirail mountains to the north of Avignon in the Vaucluse region. Their AOC designation was awarded relatively recently in 2005 and we certainly don’t see much of this red on our shelves in Ontario. Pleasantly surprising and a terrific example of the elegance that can come from these higher elevation plantings.

Aljibes Cabernet Franc 2007Rocca Delle Macìe Tenuta Sant'alfonso Chianti Classico 2011Tenuta Stefano Farina Le Brume 2009, Langhe, Piedmont ($17.95). Deliciously faulted with terrific depth and complexity for the price. Artisanally produced with sincerity and careful attention to detail. This is the product of great love and respect. For the romantics. A blend of barbera, nebbiolo and merlot.

Rocca Delle Macìe Tenuta Sant’alfonso 2011 Chianti Classico, Tuscany, Italy ($22.95). A solid Chianti Classico that will have wide appeal due to its bold flavours and complex structure. Wafting with Tuscan sunshine, this hearty, spicy sangiovese is best enjoyed with smoked sausage or corned beef.

Aljibes Cabernet Franc 2007, Vino De La Tierra De Castilla, Spain ($24.95). Spanish cabernet franc: if you haven’t tried it, you’re missing out! And if you haven’t tried it, you’re in the majority. The variety is not particularly common in Spain and plantings are mostly found in the region of Catalonia. If you are not familiar with the term Vino de la Tierra, it is a step below the DO designated wines, with looser restrictions. Wines from Tierra de Castilla tend to be modern and progressive and this lovely example certainly fits the bill.

Szabo’s Smart Buys

Henry of Pelham 2012 Estate Chardonnay Short Hills Bench, Niagara Peninsula ($19.95).  Short Hills Bench pioneers Henry of Pelham often fly just under the radar in discussions of quality and value, but the reality is that the range is as solid and reliable as they come in Niagara, and more than occasionally a wine stands out for well over-delivering. The 2012 Estate chardonnay is such a wine, reflecting the warm, even growing conditions of the 2012 season and offering a mouth filling amalgam of fruit and spice.

Cave Spring 2012  Estate Bottled Chardonnay Musqué Cave Spring Vineyard, Beamsville Bench, Niagara Peninsula ($15.95). Another local white makes the smart buy grade this week, in this case Cave Spring’s latest version of the particularly aromatic variant of chardonnay called “musqué” (although it’s unrelated to Muscat). It’s forward, intense, and aromatically engaging, while an impression of sweetness adds to the immediate appeal. Drink now with lightly spiced Thai green curries.

Henry Of Pelham Estate Chardonnay 2012Cave Spring Estate Bottled Chardonnay Musqué 2012Domaine Michel Juillot Clos Tonnerre Mercurey 1er Cru 2010Castello Di Ama Chianti Classico Riserva 2009

Domaine Michel Juillot 2010 Clos Tonnerre Mercurey 1er Cru, Burgundy, France ($32.95). Domaine Juillot has been a leading name in the Côte Châlonnaise for many years, and I’m pleased to see that quality in this 2010 more than lives up to reputation. This shows superior density and extract, all on a paradoxically light and svelte frame, delivering depth and complexity in the way that only red burgundy seems to be able to. At the price it should be taken seriously by fans of classic Burgundy to be sure.

Castello Di Ama 2009 Chianti Classico Riserva, Tuscany, Italy ($35.95). Fans of top-drawer sangiovese should consider this powerful, ripe, intense example from Castello di Ama, which is just starting to come into a nice drinking window. Tertiary spice, earth and resinous herbs mingle with sweet-tart red berry fruit in a classic regional expression.

That’s all for this week. See you over the next bottle.

From the Mar 15, 2014 Vintages release:

Classic California
Lawrason’s Take
Szabo’s Smart Buys
Sara’s Sommelier Picks
All Reviews

Editors Note: You can find our Critic’s complete reviews by clicking on any of the wine names, bottle images or links highlighted. Paid subscribers to WineAlign see all critics reviews immediately. Non-paid users wait 30 days to see new reviews. Membership has its privileges; like first access to great wines!

Beringer Private Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon 2010

California Wine Fair

Recent Posts: